Library News and Events

October 25, 2022

The federal government is making significant moves to encourage open access to research. This summer, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) made national headlines with its new guidance that, by 2026, research funded by all federal agencies should be made freely and immediately available to the public, with no embargo.

“Right now, you work for years to come up with a significant breakthrough, and if you do, you get to publish a paper in one of the top journals,” the White House announcement quoted then-Vice President Biden as saying in remarks to the American Association for Cancer Research in 2016. “And here’s the kicker — the journal owns the data for a year.”

The new guidance will bring about three significant changes to the status quo:

  • Removing the 12-month delay before research publications funded by the largest federal agencies become publicly available;
  • Directing that both federally-funded research publications and their supporting data should be made publicly accessible at the time of publication; and
  • Bringing all federal agencies into alignment with this open access publishing policy.

While the agencies are being given time to determine how they will operationalize the new guidance, the principles at its heart are in sync with the University of California’s long-standing commitment to make our research freely available to the scientific community and the public.

Here is what UC researchers should know now about what to expect:
 

When will these changes go into effect?

The OSTP guidance recommends that all federal grantmaking agencies implement the recommended changes no later than Dec. 31, 2025. Some agencies may update their grant requirements sooner.

 

What will I need to do with my research articles once this policy takes effect?

While many of the details are yet to come as each federal agency determines how they will implement the OSTP guidance, what we can infer now is that:

  • We expect the agencies that already have policies regarding public access to the research they fund will continue to use their existing processes to the extent possible, updating them as needed to align with the new guidance. We will know more about those changes once the agencies release their updated public access plans.
     
  • If you obtain future research funding from a smaller agency that does not yet require deposit in an open access repository, the agency will develop a policy requiring you to make your funded articles open access in some form. (The details may vary by agency.)

 

How does this federal guidance interact with UC’s open access publishing options?

As a UC researcher, you do not have to wait for this government policy to be implemented to make your research open access. In fact, the University of California has had an Open Access Policy in place for many years that enables UC authors to make their research publicly available immediately. To do so, you have several options:

  • If you choose to publish in a journal that is part of one of UC’s open access publishing agreements, the UC libraries will pay part or all of the open access publishing fee on your behalf depending on the terms of the agreement, using library funds that were previously allocated to pay solely for journal subscriptions.
     
  • If UC does not have an open access agreement with the publisher of the journal that has accepted your article, you can typically choose to pay an open access publishing fee to publish your article open access. Under the OSTP guidance, all federal agencies should allow researchers to include publication and data-sharing costs in their research budgets.
     
  • Another cost-free option is to upload your final accepted manuscript (i.e., prior to typesetting by the publisher) into UC’s institutional repository eScholarship. UC’s Open Access Policies allow you to make your final accepted manuscript immediately available unless the journal’s publisher requests an embargo period or a waiver of the UC policy (learn more about open access or contact us at research@library.ucsc.edu).

 

Will the new federal guidance make it easier to get funding to cover the cost of open access publishing?

While we do not yet know the details of how each agency will implement the OSTP guidance, based on the current approach of the large federal agencies, there will be a no-cost option available — such as an approved government repository — where you (or the publisher) can deposit your manuscript and meet the open access requirement at no cost.

If you wish to make the final version of your article on the journal’s website open access, the UC libraries will pay some or all of the cost for you if UC has an open access publishing agreement with the publisher. Under most of these agreements, if you do not have research funds available to pay for open access publishing, the UC libraries will pay the full amount and there will be no cost to you. Each agreement is different, so it is important to look at the terms and talk to the library when using an open access publishing agreement.

Importantly, the financial models of these agreements work when enough authors who do have research funds available for open access publishing pay their share. Most funding agencies already allow funds to be used for open access publishing fees, including flexible money that may not have been allocated explicitly for this purpose in the grant budget at the outset. The OSTP guidance, which specifies that “federal agencies should allow researchers to include reasonable publication costs,” reinforces this position for all federal agencies.  

 

Where and how do I share my data?

As agencies implement the OSTP guidance on data sharing, they may recommend or require specific repositories. Until those details are known, a subject-specific repository is usually the best place to share your data since it will be an intuitive location for other scientists to look for datasets in a particular field. There are also general repositories that take in a variety of subjects and interdisciplinary datasets. UC has partnered with the Dryad repository, and UC affiliates can deposit data there for free (as long as it is open and unrestricted, and contains no personally identifiable human subject information; see the Dryad FAQ for details).

Tip: When submitting data to a general repository, include data collection protocols, instruments, and other relevant documentation to ensure ease of data reuse. This will significantly enhance how FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) the data are.

 

Who can I contact if I have more questions?

If you have questions that were not answered above, please contact the Library at research@library.ucsc.edu.

 

September 1, 2022

A partnership between the University Library and the Visualizing Abolition initiative, this program provides space, support, and resources for a graduate student project that creatively engages the Library's special collections.

The residency lasts from fall 2022 to spring 2023, and is open to all enrolled graduate students in the Arts Division. For more details (including instructions on how to apply), see the Institute for Arts and Sciences website.

Applications are due October 3.

August 31, 2022

Starting September 1, 2022, UCSC corresponding authors can publish articles in Elsevier journals in the Cell Press and The Lancet portfolios whether or not they have research funds. The way this works is that first a 10% discount is applied to the open access fee (also known as the article processing charge (APC) ). Second, UCSC University Library will automatically pay the first $1,000 of the APC. Finally, as with the other Elsevier journals, there are two options for covering the remainder, depending on whether an author has research funds: 

  • If you need full support for the cost, the Library will cover the remainder of the open access fee, too. We welcome and expect authors without funds to use this full coverage option.
  • For authors who have research funds to contribute, we ask that you share the cost by paying the remainder of the APC so that the Library can continue subsidizing more open access articles in the future. If your funds are already earmarked for something else, the Library will still provide full support. 

For more details about this agreement, please see our Elsevier FAQ

These added journals are among many journals and publishers included in our open access support, which involves agreements like this one with Elsevier and discounts with publishers. 

Please email research@library.ucsc.edu with questions. 

July 29, 2022

IEEE and Nature journals are the newest open access publishing agreements secured by the UC Libraries for UCSC authors to consider in their publishing decisions. These options have unique characteristics, which are described below.
 

Open access publishing support in IEEE journals:

  • Dates: Starts July 15, 2022 (not retroactive prior to this date) and ends December 31, 2025
  • What is included? All IEEE journals (not proceedings)
  • What costs are covered? The discounted open access cost is either (a) paid fully by the library for authors who do not have research funds, or (b) paid fully by the author(s) who has funds to cover the whole article processing charge (APC). The agreement also covers overlength page charges for all UC authors regardless of how they choose to publish with IEEE
  • See the IEEE FAQ for more information 
     

Open access publishing support in the Nature portfolio of journals:

  • Dates: Begins August 1, 2022 (not retroactive prior to this date) and goes through December 31, 2024
  • What is included? The Nature portfolio of journals, including Nature, the Nature research journals, Nature Communications, and Scientific Reports
  • What costs are covered? The library will cover the first $1,000 of the APC, and the author(s) is fully responsible for the remainder of the cost. (Unlike some other UC open access publishing agreements, there is no full APC coverage option offered by the library for Nature journals)
  • See the Nature FAQ for more information
     

The full list of UC’s publishing agreements and discounts is available for reference.

Please reach out to the library via research@library.ucsc.edu with questions. 

June 15, 2022

In the latest issue of the library newsletter:

  • News from University Librarian Elizabeth Cowell
  • The First Rip Was the Hardest.
  • An interview with Karolina Karlic, Associate Professor at UC Santa Cruz and founder of Unseen California, and Tarrah Krajnak, Associate Professor at Pitzer College and artist-researcher with Unseen California.
  • Ingeborg Gerdes Photography Collection to be processed by a CART Fellow
  • A Special Visit to Dead Central
June 9, 2022

 

 

The Elisabeth Remak-Honnef Center for Archival Research and Training (CART) is pleased to announce the opening of this year’s exhibits curated by graduate fellows.

 

Both exhibits are on view from June 16th to December 4th, 2022, in the Third Floor Gallery of McHenry Library at UC Santa Cruz.

 

 

 

 

 Across Mediums featuring the Miriam C. and Raymond Rice PapersRay and Miriam Rice: Across Mediums is curated by Sienna Ballou (Literature) and Joseph Finkel (Musicology). This exhibit draws on the newly acquired Miriam C. and Raymond Rice Papers to explore the distinct art practices, research, and writings that Northern California artists and experimenters Miriam and Ray Rice created during their long and productive life together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 A Japanese American Family across Three Generations featuring the Yamashita Family Papers

Material Memories: A Japanese American Family across Three Generations is curated by Anny Mogollón (Literature) and Jacob Stone (Anthropology). This contemplative consideration of selected photographs and documents from the Yamashita Family Papers explores how material traces of the past can be a means to connection and communication across generations. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on these exhibits and collections, visit the Special Collections & Archives website or contact Special Collections & Archives at speccoll@library.ucsc.edu.

June 8, 2022

The UC Libraries just added a new two year open access publishing agreement with SAGE. This agreement enables all UCSC authors to publish open access articles with support from the UCSC Library. This two-year agreement starts June 7 and is retroactive to January 1, 2022.

The UCSC Library will automatically pay the first $1,000 of the open access fee for UCSC authors. After that, there are two options for the remainder:

  • If you need full support for the open access cost, the Library will cover the remainder of the open access fee. We welcome and expect authors without funds to use this full coverage option. 
  • If you have research/grant funds available, we ask you to pay the remainder of the fee so that the Library can continue subsidizing more open access articles in the future. If your funds are already earmarked for something else, the Library will still cover the full cost.

This pilot includes all of the UC campuses. Consistent with the other agreements, cost controls are in place so that the total paid by the UC libraries during the agreement is bounded, and APC rates will remain the same throughout the term of the agreement.

For more details about the agreement, please see our SAGE FAQ.

This SAGE Agreement is the 14th open access publishing agreement that the university has negotiated for our authors. The UC’s have 13 other agreements across the disciplines: ACM, ACS, Biochemical Society/Portland Press, Cambridge University Press, Canadian Science Publishing, Company of Biologists, Elsevier, JMIR Publications, National Academy of Sciences, PLoS, Royal Society, Springer Nature, and Wiley. We also have open access publishing discounts with a number of publishers.

Please contact the UCSC Library at research@library.ucsc.edu with questions. 

May 18, 2022

UCSC is now one of nearly 60 institutions part of an open access publishing agreement with the American Chemical Society (ACS), the University of California, the California State University (CSU) system, and members of the Statewide California Electronic Library Consortium (SCELC). ACS is the fourth largest publisher of scholarly journal articles by researchers in the UC system and publishes over 75 journals.

Which articles and types of publications are covered in this agreement?

All articles published between July 1, 2022 and December 31, 2025 in any ACS journal are eligible.

Open access payment workflows with ACS will be implemented July 1, 2022. For articles accepted between January 1, 2022 and July 1, 2022, authors will have the opportunity to retrospectively make their article open.

What does this mean to you as an author?

The goal of this agreement is to help authors publish articles open access with ACS. Unlike other UC open access publishing agreements, the discounted open access cost is either (a) paid fully by the library, or (b) paid by the author who has research funds sufficient to pay the full article processing charge (APC). In this agreement, you may take one of two paths:  

  • “I don’t have funds to cover open access.” The University libraries will cover the total open access fee for your article, ensuring that funding does not present a barrier to authors who want to publish open access with ACS.
  • “I have research funds to publish my article open access.” If you plan to publish open access with ACS and have funds available to do so, you may pay the discounted APC – not to exceed $3,000.

Please see more details about the article payment process.

Will we still be able to read all of the ACS journals?

Yes. UCSC affiliates will have full reading access to all ACS journals.

How do I get help?

Please reach out to the University Library at research@library.ucsc.edu with questions, and see the ACS agreement FAQ.

More OA Publishing Support

This ACS agreement is one of 13 open access publishing agreements that the UC negotiated for our authors. There are 12 other agreements across the disciplines: ACM, Biochemical Society/Portland Press, Cambridge University Press, Canadian Science Publishing, Company of Biologists, Elsevier, JMIR Publications, National Academy of Sciences, PLoS, Royal Society, Springer Nature, and Wiley. We also have open access publishing discounts with a number of publishers.

 

 

 

 

April 11, 2022

Applications for the 2022-2023 CART Fellowship Program are now open! Apply by Friday, June 10th.

This year in the Center for Archival Research and Training (CART), we are focusing on archival collections on agriculture, labor, and community in Santa Cruz County, as well as a collection of photographs and papers from artist Ingeborg Gerdes.

In the Center for Archival Research and Training, graduate students can:

  • Get hands-on, paid experience in archival processing in an academic library
  • Enhance your research skills in archives and primary sources
  • Help make archival collections more discoverable and accessible to researchers
  • Learn about different library and archives career options
  • Get experience curating a public exhibit
  • Learn about innovative digital tools that you can use in your research and teaching
  • Make connections with graduate students from different disciplines and interests

Want to learn more? Register for the CART Information session on April 20th from 12-1pm via Zoom. This session will be recorded and posted on the CART website.

More information about the Center for Archival Research and Training is available on our website. Contact CART Archivist Alix Norton at alix.norton@ucsc.edu with any questions and to submit your application. The application deadline is Friday, June 10th.

March 17, 2022

UCSC is one of five campuses selected for a one-year pilot open access publishing agreement with Wiley. This pilot enables all UCSC authors to publish open access articles with support from the UCSC Library. The agreement starts March 15 and dates retroactively back to January 1, 2022, through December 31, 2022.

The UCSC Library will automatically pay the first $1,000 of the open access fee for UCSC authors. After that, there are two options for the remainder:

  • We will cover the remainder of the open access fee if no research/grant funds are available from the author, and we welcome and expect authors without funds to use the full coverage option. 
  • If authors have research/grant funds available, we ask the authors to pay the remainder of the fee so that the Library can continue subsidizing more open access articles in the future. If your funds are already earmarked for something else, the Library will still cover the full cost.

This pilot includes five UC campuses – Irvine, Merced, Riverside, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz. The limited scope of this one-year pilot agreement allows UC and Wiley to develop and test the multi-payer payment workflow for open access, before exploring the potential for a broader transformative agreement with Wiley in the future, including all 10 campuses.

For more details about the agreement, please see the overview of the Wiley open access agreement.

This Wiley pilot is the 12th open access publishing agreement that the university has negotiated for our authors. The UC’s have 11 other agreements across the disciplines: ACM, Biochemical Society/Portland Press, Cambridge University Press, Canadian Science Publishing, Company of Biologists, Elsevier, JMIR Publications, National Academy of Sciences, PLoS, Royal Society, and Springer Nature. We also have open access publishing discounts with a number of publishers.

Please contact the UCSC Library at research@library.ucsc.edu with questions. 

February 28, 2022

We're excited to announce the official launch of the American Historical Review's new podcast History in Focus, produced and hosted by Digital Scholarship Librarian Daniel Story with help from a terrific team here at UCSC Libraries, the AHR, and the American Historical Association.

Episodes will include interviews, storytelling, and behind-the-scenes looks at the many  contexts in which history is done in the twenty-first century. The first episode, "Follow Your Nose," is streaming now.

Learn more about the podcast

February 16, 2022

We are happy to announce UC’s new open access agreement with the Biochemical Society / Portland Press.

This agreement includes open access publishing in the Biochemical Society / Portland Press’s five hybrid (subscription-based) journals and two open access journals for UCSC authors.

Under a multipayer model, authors who choose to publish open access with this publisher will automatically have the first $1,000 of the Article Processing Charge (APC) covered by the University of California libraries. Authors have two options for covering the remainder:

  • If authors have grant funds, they will be asked to contribute for the remainder of the APC to contribute to help make open access sustainable for the university.
  • When authors do not have grant funds, the UC libraries will cover the remainder of the APC, which we welcome authors to take us up on.

Those choices must be selected in the Biochemical Society / Portland Press’s payment processing system, CCC RightsLink. Alternatively, authors may opt out and publish traditionally.

Authors must be affiliated with UCSC, be the corresponding author, and publish open access to use this agreement. Please see the FAQ for more details.

UC has shifted its investment from paying to read Biochemical Society / Portland Press journals to paying based on UC authors publishing in Biochemical Society / Portland Press journals, with reading still included. Cost controls have been put in place so that the total owed by UC in any year of the agreement is capped, and APC rates will remain the same throughout the term of the agreement.

Please reach out to research@library.ucsc.edu with any questions. 

January 13, 2022

CART Fellow Jazmin Benton (PhD student in Visual Studies) created a digital exhibition titled "See you when I see you...": Black Student Life at UCSC 1965-present, which showcases the many experiences of Black students at UC Santa Cruz from its establishment in 1965 through the present day. Benton spent dozens of hours leafing through archival collections including the J. Herman Blake papers, Merrill College records, and unprocessed university archives and ephemera, finding flyers, reports, photographs, and firsthand accounts of how Black students have experienced the campus and how the campus has responded (or not responded) to their needs.

 

In Benton's own words:

As this exhibition shows, official reports and initiatives from UCSC crop up repeatedly. Recruitment and retention efforts cycle through, failing to address the daily realities of Black life on UCSC’s campus. Black students throughout the years have faced similar barriers since the first handful of us were admitted. The narratives and documents listed here will show how students were subjected to conditions such as being the only Black student in their classes, not having the resources available to center their work around Blackness, and no recourse available when faced with racist behavior.

 

There will also be a display of physical items from this exhibit in the Third Floor Gallery of McHenry Library, opening in February 2022. Visit our website for more details.

 

January 6, 2022

ProQuest databases, Alexander Street Press videos, Ebook Central, and the ProQuest Electronic Theses and Dissertation submission site will be unavailable beginning Saturday, January 15 at 7:00pm through Sunday, January 16 at 3:00am.

You can check if a particular title will be impacted by searching for the title in UC Library Search. Affected eBooks will include a service note in the record, such as the example shown below. 

Note in ProQuest ebook record stating "Please note this service will be temporarily unavailable on Saturday June 26 from 7am - 3pm

If you anticipate needing access to a Proquest ebook during this outage, download the chapters in advance

November 29, 2021

Special Collections & Archives has published a new online guide that introduces students and emerging scholars to archives and primary source research. Visitors to Archives & Archival Research: An Introduction for Students and Emerging Researchers at UC Santa Cruz can read about a range of topics that include becoming aware of silences and biases in archives, preparing for a visit to an archival repository, identifying archival collections of interest, and what to expect from your archival research process.

We built this site based on the needs of our students as well as requests by faculty and graduate teaching assistants. We designed it so that instructors can assign all or parts of it when teaching, and included are adaptable assignments and suggested discussion prompts. Questions about incorporating archival sources into a class, or finding them for an assignment? Reach out to Special Collections & Archives at speccoll@library.ucsc.edu.

Visit Archives & Archival Research: An Introduction for Students and Emerging Researchers at UC Santa Cruz

October 28, 2021

Get it at UC has replaced UC-eLinks as the linking service to full-text electronic materials. Get it at UC is a seamless way to move from an article or book citation to the actual publication and allows users to easily request an item through the Interlibrary Loan system using their CruzID Gold login and password.

Google Scholar users will need to add Get it at UC as a Library Link in Google Scholar settings in order to access the full text of materials found in Google Scholar. You can do so by following these steps: 

  1. Access the “Settings” from the expanded menu from the top left corner of the Google Scholar landing page 
  2. Click “Library Links” in the left hand menu
  3. Search for “University of California, Santa Cruz” in the search box
  4. Add “University of California, Santa Cruz – Get it at UC” to your Library Links 
  5. Remove (uncheck) “University of California, Santa Cruz- UC-eLinks” if applicable

Click the blue “Save” button in the bottom right 

 

Or check out this 25 second demo:

October 18, 2021

The University Library at UC Santa Cruz has accepted an invitation to join the Association of Research Libraries, effective January 1, 2022. The ARL is a nonprofit membership organization of more than 120 libraries and archives at major public and private universities, federal government agencies, and large public institutions in the United States and Canada. It serves as a forum for the exchange of ideas and is a catalyst for collective action to create, share, and sustain global knowledge.

Read the full article

September 23, 2021

Two new digital exhibits have been published from the summer fellows in the Center for Archival Research and Training (CART). Christina Ayson Plank and Katie Ligmond are both Visual Studies PhD students who created digital projects highlighting and contextualizing some of the collections stewarded by Special Collections & Archives. Learn more about and visit these dynamic exhibits below!

 

 

 

 

 

More than their Labor: Sites of Manong Labor and Leisure in the Pajaro Valley

Christina Ayson Plank is part of the project team for Watsonville is in the Heart, a public history initiative led by Dioscoro Recio, Jr. from The Tobera Project and UCSC faculty and students, including professors Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez and Steve McKay. Christina's exhibit highlights audio recordings and photographs documenting the plight, struggles, vitality, and resilience of the manong (roughly translated to older brother) generation of Filipino migrants who first settled in the Pajaro Valley in the early twentieth century. More than their Labor offers a glimpse into the full lives of these families and identifies geographical spots they often frequented around the Pajaro Valley.

The collection of Watsonville is in the Heart oral history interviews are described in the collection guide available via the Online Archive of California. Contact Special Collections & Archives for more information on how to access the full recordings. 

 

 

Viva los Libros: Latinx Artist Books in UCSC Special Collections

Book of Sand exhibit

 

Katie Ligmond created this digital exhibit to showcase, analyze, and compare a selection of artists' books within UCSC's Special Collections & Archives that are created by Latinx artists, authors, publishers, and communities.

The five books featured are The Book of Sand/El Libro de Arena, Everything I Kept/Todo lo que Guardé, Codex Espangliensis: from Columbus to the Border Patrol, Incantations by Mayan Women, and El Alfabeto Animado/The Lively Alphabet/Uywakunawan Qelqasqa. 

Be sure to visit the Special Collections & Archives reading room to explore these works in person!

 

September 21, 2021

During fall and winter quarter, faculty and students may request items from the Science & Engineering Library collection using UC Library Search. The Library will fill item requests via interlibrary loan or purchase.

Physical collections located in the Science & Engineering Library stacks will not be accessible during the first floor renovation project beginning Wednesday, September 22, 2021. Normal access to Science & Engineering Library physical collections should be restored by the end of spring quarter 2022.

 

FAQs

What are you doing with the physical collection during the renovation?
We will be removing the collection from its old shelves, securely storing it, and placing it in a new compact shelving system on the same floor, similar to the one in McHenry Library.

Are you shrinking the Science & Engineering Library collection?
No. Every volume that is coming off the old shelves will go into the new compact shelving system.

Why are you doing this?
Space for collections and space for library users. Compact shelving is much more space efficient. The new system will have a smaller footprint, but also add about 33% more capacity. That will help us better manage the collections we already have and give us room for their future growth. Moving the collection from its old location in the center of the floor to its new location in the southeast corner also allows us to improve and expand the Digital Scholarship Innovation Studio, and to add four new group study rooms.

Why can't we access the collections during the renovation project?
Safety. The collection is being temporarily housed in high-capacity industrial book carts. They are very heavy and very densely packed. We determined that accessing the collection during the renovation would pose an unacceptable safety risk to library staff.

 

August 27, 2021

It’s finally here -- UC Library Search is now live! UC Library users now have access to a more robust discovery tool that allows you to conduct system-wide searches for materials across all UC campus library locations. UC Library Search has replaced Melvyl and is now the discovery tool to find and borrow materials from across all UC locations, as well as from UC Santa Cruz. 

 

Take a moment to check it out and let us know if you have any questions or issues. It’s important to note that today’s launch is just the beginning; UC Library Search will continue to evolve, refine and integrate additional functionality.

 

See our FAQ and UC Library Search guide for tips.
 

More information about UC Library Search, including previous announcements, can be found at: https://libraries.universityofcalifornia.edu/uclibrarysearch

 

August 12, 2021

September 1 is the end date for our campus access to the HathiTrust Emergency Temporary Access Service (ETAS). As a member of HathiTrust, the UC Libraries were able to provide our campus access to ETAS while our physical collections remained inaccessible due to pandemic closures. With the fall reopening of our campus, the UC Libraries, and libraries nationally, the exception that permitted the service is coming to an end.

After 9/1, How Does the end of ETAS Impact You:

  • If you were an ETAS user, books you accessed online will still be discoverable through UC Library Search and are eligible for check out or borrowing through Interlibrary Loan.
  • If you are not back in Santa Cruz and are closer to a different UC campus, UC Library Search will allow you to request Interlibrary loan books and have them delivered to the UC campus closest to you for pick up there.
  • If you do not find books and films you need for your research and teaching, use the Request a Purchase form
     

The service supported our campus well through the full closure of our buildings. ETAS made 6.3 million in-copyright print titles held by UC libraries available in digital form to UCSC faculty, staff, and students. If pandemic conditions shift dramatically and health and safety concerns necessitate libraries closing again, we will work with our library partners and HathiTrust to reinstate the service. 

 

July 8, 2021

The University Library is excited to announce the establishment of a new Community Archiving Program. The Program will build on the foundation of the decades-old Regional History Project (RHP). Longtime Director of the RHP, Irene Reti has announced her plans to retire at the end of June and the Library has re-envisioned the Project to broaden its scope. The Library will soon be launching a national search for the newly created position of Community Archivist. The Community Archivist will continue to promote the method of oral history to capture the rich diversity of stories of the campus and region with a particular focus on reaching out to traditionally under-represented communities. The Community Archivist will partner with campus and community stakeholders to develop and facilitate oral history projects, serving as a resource to those interested in using the methodology in their own research or in documenting the history of their own communities. Additionally, the Community Archivist will seek out partnerships with community organizations and leaders to support the preservation of community history through other means, including, but not limited to the establishment of formal archival collections and public history projects.

Founded in 1963, the RHP has been instrumental in documenting the history of both the campus and the community and has served as a training ground for students and faculty in the field of oral history. Projects have included student-led oral histories documenting the aftermath of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and the impact of Covid-19 on the UCSC Community. The program has actively engaged with the local community since its inception, publishing oral histories on topics such as the history of agriculture on the Central Coast and working closely with other local history groups to provide guidance in developing their own oral history projects.

Reti has been part of the RHP since 1989 when she was hired as an editor. In 2004 she took over directorship of the project. Under her direction, the RHP produced over sixty oral histories, documenting the history of both the campus and Santa Cruz County. An accomplished oral historian, Reti herself conducted oral histories with such notable local and campus figures as Sam Farr, Donna Haraway and George Blumenthal. She also edited the compendium oral history volumes, Cultivating A Movement: An Oral History of Organic Farming and Sustainable Agriculture on California’s Central Coast and Out in the Redwoods: Documenting Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender History at the University of California, Santa Cruz 1965-2003. In 2020, Reti, with co-authors Sarah Rabkin and Cameron Vanderscoff, published the first comprehensive history of UCSC, Seeds of Something Different: An Oral History of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

We thank Irene for her dedication and stalwart leadership of RHP over the past 17 years and are eager to see how the work of RHP continues to grow in this new chapter.

July 8, 2021

The McHenry Library and Science & Engineering Library buildings will reopen for print collections access and on-site services beginning July 1, 2021 as part of the campus reopening.

Library patrons planning to visit the buildings on July 1 are recommended to check the University Library website in advance for the most current information regarding hours of operation, service updates and campus/building safety protocols. Certain library services and spaces will look and feel different on July 1 as the campus and library work through various operational resumption phases. Since not all librarians and library staff will transition back to in-building work on July 1, faculty, students and graduate students needing resources or assistance are encouraged to continue using Remote Library Services as the first point to access library collections and services.

July 7, 2021

On July 27, 2021, the libraries on all 10 University of California campuses will be connected through UC Library Search, a unified discovery and borrowing system. 

In preparation for the migration, My Account features will be unavailable between July 9 and July 26.  

  • Beginning July 9, you will not be able login to My Account to view your checked out items or My Favorites.  The items will be transferred to UC Library Search and will be available again after launch on July 27.

The name Melvyl is retiring and there is no guarantee that saved lists in Melvyl will be moved to UC Library Search. Before July 27, please take the following steps to save your lists elsewhere:

  • Melvyl: Log in to Melvyl by clicking “Sign In” in the upper right-hand corner of the screen. Click on your account name, and select “My Personal Lists” from the drop-down menu. From there you can access your saved lists. You can email your lists to yourself, or you can click on the “Cite” button and export them into citation management software.

 

For more information about UC Library Search, see our FAQ or contact the library.

 

June 15, 2021

The Library will be closed on Monday, July 5th in observance of Independence Day.