Biography of Charles Bruce Younger Sr.

Source: Guinn, James Miller History of the State of California and Biographical Record of Santa Cruz, San Benito, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties. An Historical Story of the State’s Marvelous Growth from its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time — by Prof. J. M. Guinn, A. M., Author of A History of Los Angeles and Vicinity, History of Southern California, Secretary and Curator of the Historical Society of Southern California, Member of the American Historical Association, Washington, D. C. Also Containing Biographies of Well-Known Citizens of the Past and Present. The Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1903. Copyright 1902 by the Chapman Publishing Co.
pp. 715-716 port. facing p. 715

Index entries:
Bell, Joseph F. (Danville, KY) 715 Charles Bruce Younger Sr. read law under him, 1853
Bridges, John L. (Judge) 715 signed the commission of Charles Bruce Younger Sr. upon admission to KY bar
Chase, Cleveland K. 716 husband of Helen Younger Chase; professor at Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana
Chase, Helen Younger 716 dau. of Jeannie Hudson Waddell & Charles Bruce Younger Sr.; wf. of Cleveland K. Chase
Doniphan, Alexander William 715 Colonel, Mexican-American War, 1848; associate of Charles Bruce Younger Sr.
Fox, Fontaine Talbott (Fountain P.) 715 Charles Bruce Younger Sr. conducted the successful election campaign of “Albert G. Talbott against Fountain P. Fox,” the Know-Nothing candidate in KY
Goodloe, W. C. (Judge) 715 signed the commission of Charles Bruce Younger Sr. upon admission to KY bar
Hihn, Agnes 716 dau. of Therese Paggen & Frederick Augustus Hihn; wf. of Charles Bruce Younger Jr.
Hihn, Therese Paggen 716 wf. of Frederick Augustus Hihn; mother of Agnes Hihn Younger
Murray, Eleanor 715 wf. of Coleman Younger; mother of Charles Bruce Younger Sr.
Know Nothing Party 715 Charles Bruce Younger Sr. conducted the successful election campaign of Albert Gallatin Talbott against Fontaine Talbott (Fountain P.) Fox, the Know-Nothing candidate in KY
Pacific Avenue St. Railroad (Santa Cruz) 716 Charles Bruce Younger Sr. was stockholder
Paggen, Therese 716 wf. of Frederick Augustus Hihn; mother of Agnes Hihn Younger
Postal Service (1858) 715 1st overland mail via El Paso & Los Angeles arrived at San José, Oct. 16, 1858; Charles Bruce Younger Sr. sent 1st telegram to San Francisco’s Alta California announcing its arrival
Santa Clara Valley Ag. Assn. 716 Charles Bruce Younger Sr. founder & secretary
Talbott, Albert Gallatin 715 Charles Bruce Younger Sr. conducted Talbott’s successful election campaign against Fontaine Talbott Fox, the Know-Nothing candidate in KY
Waddell, Jeannie Hudson 716 dau. of William White Waddell; wf. of Charles Bruce Younger Sr.
Waddell, John A. 716 son of William White Waddell; professor at Santa Clara College [University of Santa Clara]; brother of Jeannie Hudson Waddell Younger
Waddell, William White 716 father of Jeannie Hudson Waddell Younger; Santa Cruz County lumber merchant
Younger, Agnes Hihn 716 dau. of Therese Paggen & Frederick Augustus Hihn; wf. of Charles Bruce Younger Jr.
Younger, Charles Bruce Jr 716 son of Jeannie Hudson Waddell & Charles Bruce Younger Sr.; Santa Cruz attorney
Younger, Charles Bruce Sr. 715-716 port. facing p. 715; son of Eleanor Murray & Coleman [Purcell] Younger; Santa Cruz attorney; read law under Joseph F. Bell in Danville, KY; admitted to KY bar 1854; opened law office in San José, 1857; edited San Jose Tribune, 1858; San José correspondent of San Francisco’s Alta California
Younger, Coleman [Purcell] 715 husband of Eleanor Murray Younger; father of Charles Bruce Younger Sr.; served in Missouri legislature, 1844; resident of San José
Younger, Eleanor Murray 715 wf. of Coleman Younger; mother of Charles Bruce Younger Sr.
Younger, Helen 716 dau. of Jeannie Hudson Waddell & Charles Bruce Younger Sr.; wf. of Cleveland K. Chase
Younger, Jeannie Hudson Waddel 716 dau. of William White Waddell; wf. of Charles Bruce Younger Sr.
see also, bio of Edward White in Guinn, p. 326-327, in re Stephen Mallory White

The distinction of having engaged in general law practice in Santa Cruz for a longer period than any other practitioner of this city belongs to Mr. Younger, whose identification with the professional interests of the city and county covers little less than a half century. During all of these years he has not only gained a high position among the attorneys of the locality, but at the same time has been identified with the general progress of city and county, and has aided largely in those measures that promise to promote the welfare of his fellow-citizens.

The descendant of a Maryland family who were early settlers of Maryland and took part in the Revolutionary war, Mr. Younger was born in Liberty, Clay county, Mo., December 10, 1831, a son of Coleman and Eleanor ( Murray) Younger. His father, who was a native of St. Charles county, Mo., served in the Missouri legislature of 1844, and in 1850 came to California by way of Mexico. After settling in this state he gave his attention to agriculture, raising Shorthorn cattle, and trading during the balance of his life, and died here at eighty-one years of age.

As a boy Charles B. Younger attended private schools. At the age of six years he was placed under a tutor in Latin, his father deeming it essential that a lawyer should be versed in that language. He had his first sight of the circumstance of war at Fort Leavenworth, where the first regiment of Missouri volunteers were drilling preparatory to invading New Mexico, Col. A. W. Doniphan, who had enlisted as a private in the Liberty company, having been elected colonel, of the regiment. In 1848 he entered St. Joseph’s College at Bardstown, Ky., and in 1850 became a student in Center College at Danville, Ky., from which he was graduated in 1853. Subsequently he engaged in the study of law with Joseph F. Bell, of Danville, Ky. In 1854 Mr. Younger was admitted to practice as a lawyer in the courts of Kentucky. His commission was signed by Judges John L. Bridges and W. C. Goodloe.

Mr. Younger, in a local Democratic newspaper, conducted the campaign of Albert G. Talbott, the Democratic candidate, against Fountain P. Fox, the Know-Nothing candidate for representative in congress from the fourth congressional district of Kentucky. The Democratic candidate was elected. Coming to California, Mr. Younger settled in San José, where his father was a resident. Opening an office in that city, he remained there until 1871, and meantime also practiced in Santa Cruz, but the climate of the latter city proved so satisfactory that he determined to establish himself here permanently. Since April of 1857 he has had an office in Santa Cruz and has been connected with some of the most important legal cases in the county, besides acting as legal representative of the railroad companies during recent years.

October 16, 1858, the first overland mail via El Paso and Los Angeles arrived at San José, which was the telegraph station furthest south from San Francisco. Mr. Younger, who was then editing the San Jose Tribune, sent to the Alta California of San Francisco the first telegram announcing the arrival at San Jose of the overland mail stage, and this telegram gave the San Franciscans an opportunity for celebration on the arrival of the stage in that city. Mr. Younger continued to be the correspondent of the Alta until the telegraph was extended south to Gilroy. In his practice he is keen, shrewd and careful, a constant and thoughtful student of the highest legal authorities of the age, and a believer in the principles of law and practice as laid down by Blackstone, Coke and others. In his addresses and private conversation a quaint and quiet humor is noticeable, while at the same time he is logical and the possessor of fine reasoning faculties. He has one of the finest libraries in the coast region.

March 27, 1873, Mr. Younger married Jeannie H. Waddell, who was born in Lexington, Mo., and came to California in 1860, with her father, William W. Waddell, who was a large lumber merchant in Santa Cruz county. One of her brothers, John A. Waddell, is a professor in Santa Clara College. Mr. and Mrs. Younger have two children, Charles B. and Helen. The son, after graduating from the Santa Cruz high school and Leland Stanford University, took up the study of law with his father and was admitted to practice in 1897, since which time he has been in active practice. In 1897 he was admitted to practice in the supreme court of this state and in 1901 to the supreme court of the United States. January 1, 1902, his marriage united him with Miss Agnes Hihn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Hihn of this city. Miss Hihn had spent several years in Europe in travel and study; she attended the law lectures and was admitted to practice in the courts of New York and California. Miss Helen Younger graduated from Leland Stanford University, class of 1897. After spending two years in Europe in travel and study, she became the wife of Cleveland K. Chase, a professor in Earlham College, Richmond, Ind.

At the time of the incorporation of the Pacific avenue street railroad. Mr. Younger became a stockholder in the same, and also was a stockholder in the banks, besides taking part in other movements for the benefit of the city. He assisted in the founding of the Santa Clara Valley Agricultural Association and for a number of years officiated as secretary of the board. Since coming to Santa Cruz he has made various investments in real estate and still owns a considerable property, portion of which is improved. It is to such progressive men as he that Santa Cruz owes the advancement it has made in enterprises of moment and of permanent value to the city.

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