Clark, Donald T. (1911-1993)

148 Donald T. Clark

Donald T. Clark: Early UCSC History and the Founding of the University Library

Photo: Donald T. Clark. Photo by Lawrence Madison, 1986.

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1993, 203 pp. 1 illus.

 

Copyright Restrictions

PLEASE NOTE these interviews are provided for research purposes only. All uses of these manuscripts are covered by copyright agreement between the interviewees and the Regents of the University of California. All the literary rights in these manuscripts, including the right to publish, are reserved to the University of California, Santa Cruz. No part of these manuscripts may be quoted for publication without the permission of the University Librarian of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Donald T. Clark was the first of founding Chancellor Dean E. McHenry's academic appointments at UCSC. Clark arrived in September 1962 as the founder of UC Santa Cruz's University Library. Clark described his early years in Oregon and California, his undergraduate education at Willamette University, UC Berkeley, and Columbia University, and his more than twenty years at the country's largest business library, Baker Library at Harvard University. He focused much of his oral history on his tenure at UCSC from 1962-1973. He discussed the details of architectural planning for McHenry Library, and development of the book collection. Clark was a pioneer in the area of library automation, working tirelessly to create a computerized book catalog at UC Santa Cruz in the 1960s, the first such effort in the UC system. Clark describes the University Library's special collecting areas such as Santa Cruz local history and fine printing, as well as the acquisition of the Lick astronomical library, the establishment of the Center for South Pacific Studies, the founding of the Lime Kiln Press, and the acquisition of the Norman Strouse Collection of the works of Thomas Carlyle. He also discussed his own management style, his participation in the process of upgrading the professional status of librarian, and his role as chairman of the Academic Senate from 1969 to 1971.