Leo Laporte

Leo Laporte
169 Leo Laporte

Photo: Leo Laporte and teaching assistant Sarah Gray in paleontology lab, 1989. Photo by Mickey Pfleger.

1998, 48 pp., 1 illus.

For the complete text of Leo Laporte, Professor of Earth Sciences: Recollections of UCSC, 1971-1996 (E-Scholarship) Includes full audio of the oral history. Note: Due to editing by the narrator and the Project, there may be minor differences between the audio recording and the transcript. Please quote from the transcript as the record and not the audio. Audio will be found under "Supporting Material."

For the complete text of Leo Laporte, Professor of Earth Sciences: Recollections of UCSC, 1971-1996 (UCSC Library Digital Collections)

Copyright Restrictions

PLEASE NOTE these interviews are provided for research purposes only. All uses of these manuscripts are covered by copyright agreement between the interviewees and the Regents of the University of California. All the literary rights in these manuscripts, including the right to publish, are reserved to the University of California, Santa Cruz. No part of these manuscripts may be quoted for publication without the permission of the University Librarian of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Randall Jarrell conducted an oral history with Leo Laporte on August 15, 1994, as a part of the Project's interviews with retiring senior faculty. Laporte served as department chairman of Earth Sciences from 1972 to 1975, and dean as the Natural Sciences Division from 1975-1976. In 1980 he received the UC Santa Cruz Alumni Distinguished Teaching Award. In his narration, Laporte discusses the building of the earth sciences department at UC Santa Cruz, how and why certain specialties were emphasized, and how the faculty was recruited over the years. His commentary also includes this thoughts on achieving diversity in the faculty, his thoughts on diversity among the student body, and the increasing prominence of women in the geological sciences. Laporte's volume also includes his reflections on teaching, his approach to working with graduate students, and his assessment of UCSC as a "hybrid institution."