McHenry Library Inaugural Staff Exhibit: March 28, 2012 - June 29, 2012

McHenry Library Inaugural Staff Exhibit

March 28, 2012 - June 29, 2012

McHenry Library 2nd Floor - Red Study Alcove

Participating Artists

Angelika Frebert
Elise Herrera-Mahoney
Lee Jaffe
Barbro Lindblom
Sarah Lindsey
Laura McClanathan
Wes Modes
Hisako Nakazawa
Andrew Phipps
Irene Reti
Mary Ripma
Mathew E. Simpson
April Zilber

 

Staff Exhibit Guide

Angelika Frebert
Photography

Angelika Frebert is employed in Digital Initiatives, McHenry Library. Education

Photography:  BBZ Druck, Grafik und Fotografie, Munich, Germany http://www.senefelder.musin.de/
Fabric Design: Hof University of Applied Sciences, Germany http://www.hof-university.de

 

Elise Herrera-Mahoney
Photography

Elise Herrera-Mahoney is the Special Projects Manager in Administrative Services. Her connection to photography was forged with her first contact with a 35mm Pentax camera that was part of the high school yearbook equipment cache. She has been an Open Studio Artist for the last two years and has shown her photography at a variety of First Friday venues. Her artistic vision is to capture the character, beauty, and grace of common, everyday objects and scenes. She was taught and adheres to the philosophy to capture the image with one shot.  She does not alter the structure of the original image, but with the computer as her new darkroom, she sometimes applies a digital wash to enrich the emotion and impact of the photograph. To view her complete portfolio, go to  ehmahoney.com.

 

Lee Jaffe
Photography

Lee Jaffe has been working at the UCSC Library since 1987. In a previous, pre-digital life, he studied and practiced darkroom photography as an avid amateur. He picked up photography again in 2005, inspired by the animals, plants, and landscapes he encountered while walking the UCSC campus. More of his photos can be seen at   http://www.flickr.com/photos/ldjaffe.

 

Barbro Lindblom
Painting

Barbro Lindlblom worked in the Offsite Shared Collection department and was an employee for 26 years and retired in 2011. I was born in Stockholm, Sweden and moved to California in 1983.

In 2003, I took up watercolors, using a detailed dry-brush technique. However, I had always been intrigued by the mystical and dreamlike quality attainable with soft pastels, and a few years ago I decided to try the

medium for myself. I was immediately seduced by the feel of the sticks against the textured paper and by the luminous colors that could be applied so directly. I continue to be fascinated by the complexity and the endless possibilities of this art form and enjoy learning and exploring with each new painting. I have had several of my watercolor and pastel paintings shown at juried exhibits at the Santa Cruz Art League.

 

Sarah Lindsey
Knitted Animals

Sarah Lindsey works in the Collection Maintenance department and for the Grateful Dead Archive. She enjoys knitting life-sized models of tiny creatures as well as sweaters, socks, blankets, and other "useful" items. An avid crafter, Sarah documents her projects on her blog:  burymewithmyneedles.com.


Laura McClanathan
Photography

Laura McClanathan (Cowell '89) has been a staff member in McHenry Library for 18 years. Her work in Reference inspired her to study the history and philosophy of photography, which led her to specialize in sepia-toned technique. Laura enjoys documenting the unique natural beauty of the UC Santa Cruz campus and surrounding area, and her work has been featured in scholarly publications and local exhibits. She is currently an artist-member of the Davenport Gallery, a local art cooperative. For more information, please visit A Sepia Lens,  http://asepialens.com.

 

Wes Modes
Industrial Whimsy and Found Art

Wes Modes works in the Information Technology Services division as a systems developer and administrator. He is an artist and hightech runaway. In various lives, he is a sculptor, writer, performer, comic artist, and mischiefmaker. Wes Modes has an irrepressible sense of adventure. He collects shiny baubles, and pieces of rusty junk he finds on his wanderings. He hops freight trains and gets in trouble.  His favorite places are the Muni tunnels, the metal scrap heap at the dump, the china basin wastelands, old military bases, abandoned old houses, ancient antique stores, urban desolation – the magic places where anything can happen.  His work can be seen at  http://thespoon.com/art.

 

Hisako Nakazawa
Book Arts

Hisako Nakazawa is a conservator in Special Collections and Archives. She has a background in fine arts with an emphasis in sculpture at the Maryland Institute, College of Art and also Art school in Tokyo. In 2000, she moved to Santa Cruz and began working at the University Library, UCSC.

Her works have been shown at numerous exhibitions in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and Japan.

  • [Beauty of the Book] at McHenry Library in 2005  http://library/exhibits/beauty-of-the-book1
  • [A Letter from a Bug] was exhibited in Tokyo, Japan and in Liom, France as a collection at Special Collections of the University Library, UCSC in 2006
  • Annual Members’ Exhibition at The Hand Bookbinders of California since 2000-present
  • My memorable work s in conservation are restoration of  [Box in a Valise] by Marcel Duchamp and [KAKO CHO,1711] owned by Ankoku-ji Temple in Japan

 

Andrew Phipps
Photography

Andrew “Fish” Phipps is employed in the Information Technology Services division as a computer resource specialist.

 

Irene Reti
Photography

Irene Reti is the director of the UCSC Library’s Regional History Project, an oral history research office that documents the history of the campus and of the Central Coast. She graduated from Kresge College in environmental studies in 1982. In addition to her work as an oral historian, Irene has been the publisher of HerBooks/Juniper  Lake Press since 1984, a literary feminist press that crosses borders and genres. She has written several books; her most recent is Kabbalah of Stone, a lyrical and suspenseful novel that explores gender and sexuality in Medieval Spain. Recently Irene has rediscovered a passion for photography and loves photographing the landscape of UCSC, the place she has called home for the past 34 years. For Irene, photography is a form of prayer, meditation, listening, connection, discovery, and unification with the environment.


Mary Ripma
Quilts

Mary Ripma is employed in the Circulation Department in both the Science & Engineering and McHenry Libraries. Mary Austin Ripma lived with her family in New Zealand from 2004-2010. She learned to quilt while a member of Warkworth Quilters in New Zealand’s North Island.

“Clay is 21,” Mary’s twelfth quilt, exhibited at the 2011 World Quilt Show in New Hampshire. The four Swarovski Crystals represent the places where her son Clay has lived in his first 21 years. Previously Mary worked as a Reference Librarian at the Menlo Park Public Library and as an Information Specialist in DIALOG’s Customer Service.  Jenny Bailey of Quietly Quilting in Kaiwaka, New Zealand assisted in completing the quilt by quilting on her longarm machine.

 

Mathew E. Simpson
Photography

Mathew has worked at the Library since the late 1980s, originally in Preservation and currently in Archives Processing. He was born and raised in a very small town near Lake Michigan in northwest Lower Michigan, but has now lived in Santa Cruz longer than anywhere else on the planet.

He has never been a professional artist, but has made drawings and taken photographs for pleasure his entire adult life. Starting out with a Polaroid and an Instamatic as a child, Mathew has taken thousands of photographs, an accumulation that has only gotten worse with the advent of digital photography. More often than not he still takes pictures without people in them, even though his father told him he would regret that “later on” (and it’s now forty-some years later). For this library exhibit he thought that a photo of a door ajar at the Bodleian Library at Oxford University would be relevant, as it beckons one to the mysteries of the knowledge within.

Along with a few art classes, Mathew took drafting classes throughout high school and had put two years of college towards a degree in architecture before changing majors to the humanities, ending up with a Bachelor of Philosophy degree with emphasis in history and literature at the radical (and therefore now defunct) Thomas Jefferson College at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. Every so often he gets motivated to produce an ink drawing using some of the rendering skills he learned as an architectural student, as for example the work in this exhibit of the Demming House on Beach Hill in Santa Cruz, where he was living at the time. Now he tends to use a more pragmatic part of that education, producing blueprints for the city to sign off on for the periodic remodeling projects he undertakes with his life partner Cher Bergeon of their home on the Westside of Santa Cruz.

 

April Zilber
Fused Glass

April Zilber is employed in the Circulation Department. The first metal and glass panels I created were inspired by the cellular architecture of xylem, the woody part of a tree. This departure from typical fused glass was also a necessity; a deteriorating crucible at the factory had yielded clear sheets that were incompatible with the colored sheets. Forced to make art with clear glass alone, I tried adding metal. The results amazed me, thus a serious technical issue transformed into serendipity.

My plant biology training, which started at UCSC, contributes both inspiration and technical grounding to my artwork. I take time gazing at trees, flowers and seeds. I draw on metal foil, cut out the image, and sandwich it between layers of glass. When fused at high temperature in the kiln, oxidation/reduction  chemistry occurs between the metal and glass, leading to subtle or dramatic spontaneous effects that enrich my designs.

I work with spiral forms that evoke fossil shells, galaxies, and the cyclical nature of time. Growth patterns of roots, flowers, and cones have an expanding radial symmetry that appeals to me. Since moving to the woods I have been creating whole tree images, and recently, portraits of trees I admire. The awesome complexity of living plants, shaped by weather, insects and other influences, reminds us that beauty is not a matter of simple perfection. I live and work in a community of redwoods, madrones, and oaks that share their breath with me. Contact Information: 831-335-7024,  zilberglass@earthlink.net,  http://www.zilberglass.blogspot.com.

 

Art exhibit curated and installed by Elise Herrera-Mahoney and Laura McClanathan.